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Tractor Implements: Frequently Asked Questions

With so many different tractor implements out there, people often have questions about them. Here are some common questions and answers related to tractor implements.

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Frequently Asked Questions About Tractor Implements:

  1. How do you use a front-end loader on a tractor?
  2. Is a rotary cutter the same as a brush hog?
  3. How fast should you pull a disc harrow?
  4. What’s the difference between a finishing mower and a rotary cutter?
  5. Can you plow snow with a box blade?
  6. How do you attach a post hole digger to a tractor?

How do you use a front-end loader on a tractor?

Using the front-end loader on your tractor effectively can require some practice and skill. While you’ll need to practice and learn your equipment, here are some quick tips that can help you use a front-end loader more effectively:

  1. Carry the load low while driving to reduce the risk of rolling over.
  2. Break up tough, crusted-over piles of material using the corner of the bucket.
  3. Make sure the bucket is level when driving into a pile of material.
  4. Use the raise and curl technique to get a larger scoop of material. This means alternating between raising and curling movements while picking up a load.
  5. Abruptly (but gently) bump the joystick after scooping up a load to shake off excess material that may dislodge while driving.

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Is a rotary cutter the same as a brush hog?

Yes, a rotary cutter is the same tool as a brush hog. A “brush hog” is simply another name for a rotary cutter.

You may also hear this piece of machinery referred to as a “bush hog.” Although people use the term “bush hog” to refer to a rotary cutter, it is actually a popular brand name of agricultural equipment.

Regardless of the term you use, all three are acceptable names for the powerful mowing machine.

How fast should you pull a disc harrow?

The speed at which you disc influences your results. For this reason, it’s important to be able to determine the most optimal discing speed.

How fast you should pull a disc harrow depends on the properties of your soil and the disc harrow itself but, in general, disc harrows are most effective when being pulled between 4.5 and 7 miles per hour.

Most disc harrow manuals include a troubleshooting guide to help you fix problems and determine the optimum speed for your soil and equipment. For example, check out page 24 of this Land Pride disc harrow operator’s manual.

What’s the difference between a finishing mower and a rotary cutter?

Rotary cutters, also known as brush hogs, are often confused with finishing (grooming) mowers. Although they appear to be similar, they are actually used for different purposes.

Rotary cutters are designed to chop through tough plant material, leaving a rough finish. Finishing mowers are designed to leave a clean, low-cut grass surface on the area it covers.

That being said, rotary cutters should be used to cut tough grass and other plants before they get too tall to manage (without worrying about appearance), while finishing mowers should be used on the nice, grassy parts of your property that you want to look the best.

Can you plow snow with a box blade?

If you experience snowy winters and don’t have a snow-blower/blade attachment for your tractor, you may be tempted to use your box blade to plow snow.

A box blade can be used to plow snow but is typically not as effective as a snow-blower or blade.

There are also a couple of small advantages of using a box blade to plow snow though. Since the box blade is mounted in the rear of the tractor, it can be used to grab snow away from walls and garage doors, rather than pushing the snow into it as a snow blade would.

Additionally, if you’re using your box blade to clear snow from a gravel driveway, the box blade can level your driveway at the same time as you’re clearing the snow. Multitasking at its finest!

How do you attach a post hole digger to a tractor?

Attaching a post hole digger to a tractor is not an easy task. If possible, you should find someone to help you install it. Although, it is still possible to install it by yourself. Watch this short video to learn how to properly install a post hole digger to a tractor:

Video Summary

  1. Attach the post hold digger where the top link usually goes.
  2. Attach the PTO shaft.
  3. Attach both lift arms.
  4. Set the stabilizers so the post hole digger doesn’t sway back and forth.

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